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unconsumption:


The Japanese tradition of kintsugi — the artful repairing of damaged objects — is a practice that continues to fascinate me. In our society today, most things are not repaired if broken.
If a toaster quits working, the normal practice is to throw it away and get a replacement. Still, shoes get repaired. Automobiles do — probably more than we’d like — and iPhones can be repaired if the damage is not severe.
This week’s post looks at things broken, repaired and/or mended — and the beauty of such.

Some pleasant Sunday eye candy at: Accidental Mysteries, 10.07.12: Broken, Repaired & Mended: Observatory: Design Observer

unconsumption:

The Japanese tradition of kintsugi — the artful repairing of damaged objects — is a practice that continues to fascinate me. In our society today, most things are not repaired if broken.

If a toaster quits working, the normal practice is to throw it away and get a replacement. Still, shoes get repaired. Automobiles do — probably more than we’d like — and iPhones can be repaired if the damage is not severe.

This week’s post looks at things broken, repaired and/or mended — and the beauty of such.

Some pleasant Sunday eye candy at: Accidental Mysteries, 10.07.12: Broken, Repaired & Mended: Observatory: Design Observer

thisisendless:

This is “Beachy Head”; a prominent chalk headland located between Eastbourne and Birling Gap on the south coast of England.It is the highest chalk headland in Great Britain being 162 metres at its highest point above sea level. The cliffs were formed over a period of 30 million years; between 95 to 65 million years ago when a sub-tropical sea covered the area. The shells of billions of microscopic planktonic algae formed a deposit which eventually hardened into layers of white rock a thousand feet thick. This has since been uplifted due to continental movement and subsequent erosion has created what is seen today. Beautiful! 
-Jean 
Photo courtesy of Rhys Davies.
From The Earth Story.

thisisendless:

This is “Beachy Head”; a prominent chalk headland located between Eastbourne and Birling Gap on the south coast of England.It is the highest chalk headland in Great Britain being 162 metres at its highest point above sea level. The cliffs were formed over a period of 30 million years; between 95 to 65 million years ago when a sub-tropical sea covered the area. The shells of billions of microscopic planktonic algae formed a deposit which eventually hardened into layers of white rock a thousand feet thick. This has since been uplifted due to continental movement and subsequent erosion has created what is seen today. Beautiful!
-Jean
Photo courtesy of Rhys Davies.

From The Earth Story.

(via beyondmetaphysics)