Instagram

Showing 23 posts tagged space

jtotheizzoe:

kqedscience:

will.i.am, NASA team up for first song from Mars
“will.i.am listens to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Sciences and Exploration Directorate Chief Scientist Jim Garvin talk next to a mock up of the Mars rover Curiosity in Pasadena, Calif. Today at 4PM EDT, NASA will debut a new song by will.i.am.”

Will.i.am … you are hereby forgiven for the auditory misdeeds of the Black Eyed Peas, thanks to your tireless work to support science and expand education.
And because of the robots. You are a robot/science/art hero. Thank you.
Tune in later today (4 PM Eastern) on NASA TV to stream the event, where Mr. Am’s new song will be broadcast from the surface of Mars. It’s amazing that I just got to type those words.

jtotheizzoe:

kqedscience:

will.i.am, NASA team up for first song from Mars

“will.i.am listens to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Sciences and Exploration Directorate Chief Scientist Jim Garvin talk next to a mock up of the Mars rover Curiosity in Pasadena, Calif. Today at 4PM EDT, NASA will debut a new song by will.i.am.”

Will.i.am … you are hereby forgiven for the auditory misdeeds of the Black Eyed Peas, thanks to your tireless work to support science and expand education.

And because of the robots. You are a robot/science/art hero. Thank you.

Tune in later today (4 PM Eastern) on NASA TV to stream the event, where Mr. Am’s new song will be broadcast from the surface of Mars. It’s amazing that I just got to type those words.

Is manned space exploration worth the cost?

quantumaniac:

The debate about the relative merits of exploring space with humans and robots is as old as the space program itself. Werner Von Braun, a moving force behind the Apollo Program that sent humans to the moon and the architect of the mighty Saturn V rocket, believed passionately in the value of human exploration — especially when it meant beating the hated Soviet Empire. James Van Allen, discoverer of the magnetic fields that bear his name, was equally ardent and vocal about the value of robotic exploration.

There are five arguments that are advanced in any discussion about the utility of space exploration and the roles of humans and robots. Those arguments, in roughly ascending order of advocate support, are the following:

1. Space exploration will eventually allow us to establish a human civilization on another world (e.g., Mars) as a hedge against the type of catastrophe that wiped out the dinosaurs.

2. We explore space and create important new technologies to advance our economy. It is true that, for every dollar we spend on the space program, the U.S. economy receives about $8 of economic benefit. Space exploration can also serve as a stimulus for children to enter the fields of science and engineering.

3. Space exploration in an international context offers a peaceful cooperative venue that is a valuable alternative to nation state hostilities. One can look at the International Space Station and marvel that the former Soviet Union and the U.S. are now active partners. International cooperation is also a way to reduce costs.

4. National prestige requires that the U.S. continue to be a leader in space, and that includes human exploration. History tells us that great civilizations dare not abandon exploration.

5. Exploration of space will provide humanity with an answer to the most fundamental questions: Are we alone? Are there other forms of life beside those on Earth?

It is these last two arguments that are the most compelling to me. It is challenging to make the case that humans are necessary to the type of scientific exploration that may bring evidence of life on another world. There are strong arguments on both sides. Personally, I think humans will be better at unstructured environment exploration than any existing robot for a very long time.

There are those who say that exploration with humans is simply too expensive for the return we receive. However, I cannot imagine any U.S. President announcing that we are abandoning space exploration with humans and leaving it to the Chinese, Russians, Indians, Japanese or any other group. I can imagine the U.S. engaging in much more expansive international cooperation.

Humans will be exploring space. The challenge is to be sure that they accomplish meaningful exploration.

-G. Scott Hubbard, professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University and former director of the NASA Ames Research Center

jtotheizzoe:

jtotheizzoe:

Whoa! The Curiosity rover parachute descent captured by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter!
A spacecraft, orbiting another planet, captured a picture of another spacecraft landing on that planet.
This isn’t the first time it has gotten a shot like this.
(image by NASA/JPL)

Updated with a higher-res photo showing the surrounding Martian terrain.

jtotheizzoe:

jtotheizzoe:

Whoa! The Curiosity rover parachute descent captured by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter!

A spacecraft, orbiting another planet, captured a picture of another spacecraft landing on that planet.

This isn’t the first time it has gotten a shot like this.

(image by NASA/JPL)

Updated with a higher-res photo showing the surrounding Martian terrain.

(via physicsphysics)

“We’re going to explore the cosmos in a ship of the imagination, unfettered by the ordinary limits on speed and size, drawn by the music of cosmic harmonies. It can take us anywhere in space and time. Perfect as a snowflake, organic as a dandelion seed, it will carry us to worlds of dreams, and worlds of facts. Come with me.”

(via afro-dominicano)

jtotheizzoe:

Chemistry On Mars!

The Curiosity Rover’s Mission to Uncover Martian Habitability  

Bytesize Science took a visit to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratories to find out more about the Curiosity Rover’s mission to explore habitability (the ability for Mars to have supported life in the past) using an advanced onboard science lab.

Curiosity will use internal and external equipment from x-ray diffraction to laser spectrometry (shot from its “eye”!!) to do the same advanced chemical analysis that we can do here on Earth … only on Mars. This is the most advanced rover ever deployed, and should really be called a mobile laboratory. 

I guess that is probably why the project is called “Mars Science Laboratory” … anyway …

As it roams Gale Crater, drilling its own samples and sending the mineral analysis back to Earth, NASA hopes to draw a timeline of early Martian geology. This way, we can see if the planet ever had conditions more supportive of life in the past.

SIX DAYS UNTIL LANDING, PEOPLE. SIX DAYS.